5 big messages

These 12 stories have taught us a lot about what is important to the individuals who took part. But when we see these stories side-by-side, however, we can also learn about some key failures of the system, and about what is needed to support recovery. Here are our key lessons:

 

Insights map

 

Coping with love, rejection & trauma

icons3Unaddressed childhood trauma and rejection from a loved one, linked with a lack of support to cope with this trauma are often at the source of many of the issues people experience later in life. Access to therapeutic support is key.

For a more in-depth insight, read these stories and blog posts:

Lizz  Zeb  Natasha  Tex  Martin  Karen  Stuart  Colin
Coping with love and rejection  Society’s expectations of you shape you

 

 

What is normal?

icons4.pngPeople experiencing severe and multiple disadvantage have often grown up in worlds where alcohol or drug use, violence, or offending are normal. How much does it take for someone to recognise and challenge these norms? Services need to not just focus on the individual, but also support whole families and sometimes communities to change.

For a more in-depth insight, read these stories and blog posts:

Paul  James  Natasha  Tex  Steve

 

 

The system is full of missed opportunities

icons5Most of the interactions people have had with services could be seen as missed opportunities. By stigmatising people and focusing on ‘risk’ rather than recovery, services end up not providing the right support and disempower people. Services are missing key moments when help is needed and people are reaching out.

For a more in-depth insight, read these stories and blog posts:

Lizz  James  Natasha  Steve
A system of missed opportunities   The system punishes you for doing well

 

 

Change: “the hardest thing you’ll have to do in your life.”

icons2Acknowledging traumas and learning to be vulnerable are part of the recovery journey. It can be challenging to adapt to a “stable” life, especially when it means giving up on old relationships and environments, or when people then have to face universal services that don’t recognise how far they have come. We need to recognise that recovery is a journey, not just a step.

For a more in-depth insight, read these stories and blog posts:

Lizz  Zeb  Natasha  Tex  Martin  Karen  Lee  Colin
Building a new me – Part 1    Building a new me – Part 2

 

 

Recovery is a social journey

iconsExperiencing addiction, abuse or homelessness can be very isolating, and people experiencing those issues have often had to follow their own independent path from a young age. The system sometimes reinforces people’s isolation and sense that it is all their fault, while the circumstances they are in are in fact the result of a set of interdependent relationships. We need to support people to build positive relationships and social networks, and to be part of “recovery communities.”

For a more in-depth insight, read these stories and blog posts:

Lizz  Tex  Martin  Lee  Colin

 

 

%d bloggers like this: